Academy

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NICK SAYS...
Nick Says
Pro - Team Nick Barsby shares his latest and greatest tips & techniques

LIBRARY

How to Boatcast - by Bob Cox

Bob's Original Boat Casting.

The most common and useful style of boatcasting is when a wired lead is cast across and either uptide or downtide from the boat, and anchored where it hits the seabed (see Figure 4). The skills required to do this are not difficult to master, providing a few basic rules are followed and assuming that the terminal rigs and line diameters mentioned in this book are used.

    Using either a fixed spool or a multiplier reel, cast a few yards further uptide of where you want your bait to stay. Make sure, of course,  that you are not casting over the next angler's tackle and observe the safety procedures. Stop the line leaving the reel as the lead hits the sea, then, under gentle pressure, allow the tide and the sinking lead to pull line from the reel until the lead is felt to hit the bottom. At this point, reduce the thumb pressure on the line and allow the tide to carry the line downtide until it is leaving the rod tip at an angle of approximately 900 from where the lead entered the water (see Figure 6). Pay out a few yards of slack line and gently place the rod in the rest. Try to avoid any jerky actions which may cause the lead to pull out prematurely. It is a good idea to keep the reel out of gear, but with reasonable thumb pressure, until the rod has been placed in the rest, then knock it in gear. It is then left to the tide to take up the slack in the line and gently pull the rod tip over. Only experience will ten you what weight of lead is necessary to hold bottom for any given tide strength. But if your lead is too light or, in the case of breakaways the wires are tensioned too lightly, then the lead will fail to take a firm hold and the rod tip will nod as the lead trundles off downtide. Either increase the weight of the lead or re-tension the breakaway wires until the lead will hold bottom. If you are fishing towards... Read more here....

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